Posts Tagged With: permaculture orchard

I insist, a-Fuyu

I picked a bunch of orange colored  Fuyu persimmons from our orchard this morning after yesterday’s snowfall. The taste is fresh, mild, pleasant, and sweet. The texture is crisp. For the eyes, Fuyu is a show-stopper! We experimented with dehydrating slices of persimmon.

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Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment

Midwinter Thaw

I visited our permaculture orchard early this afternoon. We’re having a thaw after a couple of weeks of hard freeze conditions. Last night and this morning, the rain has been plentiful. In the little video posted below, you will see:

  • hybrid plums and black currants and asian persimmon planted on the raised berm,
  • a swale catching melted snow and water running down the slope of the land,
  • black alder (Alnus glutinosa) which I planted in the swales because they tolerate wet conditions and help manage water, fix nitrogen and build soil fertility, provide early pollen to the bees (see those catkins?), provide habitat and food for many creatures, and can easily be coppiced,
  • wild perennial weeds (especially aster and goldenrod last fall) and grasses growing in the swale which stabilize the soil, help water to percolate into the soil, and provide food and habitat for many creatures, and
  • a 3-d deer fence in the background which allows most every animal to sneak into the orchard but is excellent for preventing deer from coming into the orchard and damaging/eating our plantings.

 

 

I, also, found this hardy character growing cheerfully in the rain! We planted plenty of rhubarb last spring once we found that we liked rhubarb mead so much. They are doing well!

Categories: Climate, Flora, food, Grasses, Herbaceous Plants, Orchard, permaculture, Soil, Strategies, Trees, Water | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Orchard Update

We’ve had around 2′ of snow and, then, warmer weather. As the thaw continued, we had about 1.25″ of rain. Water is flowing. The swales in the orchard seem to capture and absorb the water effectively. None of the berms are overflowing or come near it. There are a few drainage sites that I dug last year that continue to function in part. I will consider clearing them should I find the swales are getting too full. This photo shows the 1/2 acre orchard which has four swales and berms running on contour, generally, west to east. The slope faces south. The pond is downslope from and south east of the orchard. It is interesting to see the pattern of the snow/thaw on the slope.

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The next four photos show each swale and berm from top of the slope, north to lower on the slope, south. The trees you see planted in the swale are alnus glutinosa or common alder. They love the moisture and excel at fixing nitrogen in the soil.

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This is the very full pond.

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And a full rainy day view from east to west, bamboo, pond and woodlot, and orchard.

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At this point, I’m happy with the swales and berms in this orchard. It is clearly a moist place especially on the south end and we’ll see how the trees tolerate the conditions. The only plants we’ve lost so far have been a few seaberries on the first berm at the top of the slope. I, also, lost some alders. They were not rooted well enough when the swales were flooding the first year. I’ve ordered some more currants, gooseberries, replacement seaberries, and raspberries to tuck in where there seems to be some extra space.

 

 

 

Categories: Climate, Orchard, Strategies, Water | Tags: , , , , | 3 Comments

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